Jason Knill at WordCamp Los Angeles 2015 -- Photo by Found Art PhotographyEarlier this year Matt Mullenweg put out a call to gather testimonials about why people love WordPress with the #ILoveWP hashtag. Those answers will be aggregated by the hashtag and curated on WordPress.org.

#ILoveWP because of, well, a lot of reasons.

#ILoveWP because I can accomplish my goals while staying energized and curious in a world that seems to move too fast, without much thought or purposefulness.

A little backstory

I was born in the 80’s. I’m a Taurus. There are two distinct things I remember in my childhood that have an immeasurable impact on the way I view the world. The first, playing word and math problem games with my mom. The second, playing unorganized sports around the neighborhood I grew up in called Jefferson Park.

Keep in mind, the games were done around a table with pens and paper. The sports were played by first walking around the block with my friend Donny and knocking on neighbors doors. I’m a millennial and, yes, many of us have had these same experiences despite what some blog or keynote speaker told you. I really enjoyed them.

Each of us today, including me, operates very differently than the scenarios described above, yet WordPress peeps seem to move at a comfortable 90’s pace of “door knocks” when compared to most other sectors.

WordPress and Learning

#ILoveWP because it empowers me to find answers elsewhere.

In today’s world if there’s a word problem you can’t solve, Google it. Want to build a team to play street hockey? Set-up a group text or Slack channel and send it out.

Unfortunately and fortunately, I crave the non-Google way. Despite our team’s ability to understand and move between the digital world and daily customer habits (online and off), the answers we seek are often not found in a search toolbar.

My answers are found, more often than before, within the communities I interact in rather than Google.

WordCamps, a constant flow of well-written, detailed, and compelling arguments using real data (good WP blogs), WordPress.tv, Facebook groups, experts I’ve met from WordCamp, and my team at WordImpress empower this “non-Google way” — in every way.

And when I seek answers within more engaged, educated and “willing to consider” communities, I am much better off than getting the word of the day from some web property — or “search toolbar.”

WordPress jives with my Value System

#ILoveWP because the folks I meet seem to hold similar interests and value systems, including:

  1. The easy button is not effective for our human condition. Even WordPress requires rigor.
  2. Technology improves productivity and is really cool, but doesn’t automatically make us better human beings.
  3. Get it done “now” is not the answer for anything other than a bathroom break.
  4. Hard work is that; hard work. When it’s done, you do it again. That’s why it’s hard.
  5. You don’t become an expert because you read a blog or managed some tertiary media buy for a Fortune 50. Time. Is. Required.

WordPress Folks are Curious

Over the last two years, as I’ve been on my journey with WordImpress I’ve discovered that the best in WordPress have two attributes that speak to their actions: A proper mix of both rigor and curiosity. Ultimately #ILoveWP, because it allows for rigor and curiosity—and encourages it in every way.

I often find that most WP folks I meet agree that curiosity and rigor are too often left out of the “other lifestyles/jobs/labor” because folks doing the work don’t seem to care deeply about what they do — day to day.

#ILoveWP because it helped me remember those challenging problems I solved with my mom.

A recap of why #ILoveWP

#ILoveWP because it allows me to accomplish my goals while staying energized and curious in a modern world that seems to move too fast, without much thought or purposefulness.

#ILoveWP because it empowers me to find answers elsewhere.

#ILoveWP because the folks I meet seem to hold similar interests and value systems.

#ILoveWP because it allows for Rigor and Curiosity—and encourages it.

#ILoveWP because it helped me remember those challenging problems I solved with my mom.

Why do you love WordPress?

Tell us in the comments.

 

Jason Knill is the Head of Finance at WordImpress. He likes golf, running, fishing and occasionally writes.

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